About E. coli

From the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness outbreaks.

Chapter 8

Treatment for E. coli infection

How are E. coli infections treated?

In most infected individuals, symptoms of a Shiga toxin-producing E. coli infection last about a week and resolve without any long-term problems. [1, 42]

Antibiotics do not improve the illness, and some medical researchers believe that these medications can increase the risk of developing HUS. [43, 66] Therefore, apart from supportive care, such as close attention to hydration and nutrition, there is no specific therapy to halt E. coli symptoms. [42] The recent finding that E. coli O157:H7 initially speeds up blood coagulation may lead to future medical therapies that could forestall the most serious consequences. [34] Most individuals who do not develop HUS recover within two weeks. [33, 42]

For information about treatment for HUS, see www.about-HUS.com.

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How is E. coli infection diagnosed?

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