About E. coli

From the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness outbreaks.

Outbreaks

Dee Creek Farm E. coli Outbreak

Unpasteurized milk sold through a cow-share program at the Dee Creek Farm in Woodland, Washington, was the source of an E. coli O157:H7 outbreak in southwestern Washington in December, 2005.

Prior to the December outbreak, the Washington State Department of Agriculture (WSDA) had learned of Dee Creek Farm’s cow-share program, and had ordered the farm to cease the dispensing, giving, trading, or selling of milk or to meet requirements for selling milk that had been laid out by WSDA. The letter was sent in August, 2005, and WSDA received a response from Dee Creek Farm in September, 2005, stating that the farm was not selling milk but that the farm’s owners intended to meet requirements for a milk producer and retail raw milk processor in the future.

When its investigation was completed, WSDA had identified eighteen people who had consumed raw milk purchased from Dee Creek Farm through the cow-share program and developed symptoms consistent with E. coli infection. Five Clark County, Washington, children were hospitalized, with two developing hemolytic uremic syndrome and requiring critical care and life support for kidney failure as a result of their E. coli infections.

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