About E. coli

From the nation’s leading law firm representing victims of E. coli and other foodborne illness outbreaks.

About E. coli Blog

Just Another Week of E. coli Taking Victims In Amercia

We thought we’d do something different today, and just give a rundown on the E, coli news we’ve been involved in.  Every week is getting to be E. coli week in America.  This is a look-back on the last one.  Here we go!

We received several calls last Monday from  sorority sisters who had been sickened by E. coli O157:H7 at the University of Colorado in Boulder.  Interestingly, the common denominator seems to be Jimmy John’s – just off campus.  Coincidentally, the first inspection since 7/28/06 occurred on 9/28/08 and the report was mailed,also on Monday, to Mr. Prescott (the owner) .  The purpose was to investigate "suspect food-borne illness complaint who reported eating at the facility. Complainants had approximately 13 sandwich plates with 10 sandwiches each delivered to their facility on Sept. 20th.  Sandwiches included Big John’s, Turkey Tom, Ham and Cheese, and Vegetarian."  E. coli does not seem to be listed as an ingredient – yet.

On Tuesday Butte County health officials announced  that leftover frozen tainted tri-tip, that sickened at least 27 people, tested positive for E. coli O157:H7 bacteria.  The bacteria in the meat perfectly matches (by PFGE genetic fingerprint) the bacteria found in stool samples taken from several people who became ill.

 

The first lawsuit stemming from a recent lettuce-borne E. coli outbreak was filed at week’s end in the Circuit Court for Ingham County, Michigan against Aunt Mid’s Produce. The petition was filed on behalf of Michigan State University (MSU) student and East Lansing resident Samantha Steffen.  In September 2008, at least 34 people were sickened by the virulent E. coli strain O157:H7. The ill were concentrated in Michigan, and included students at MSU Lansing as well as inmates at a Michigan jail. The outbreak was traced to contaminated lettuce distributed by Aunt Mid’s Produce of Detroit, Michigan.

Samantha Steffen consumed lettuce on campus in early September, and by September 13, she began to experience nausea, abdominal cramps, and frequent bouts of diarrhea. In the next couple of days, her diarrhea turned bloody, and she asked a friend to take her to the emergency room where she was treated for severe dehydration. A stool sample taken there revealed that she was infected with E. coli O157:H7. After her release from the ER, Ms. Steffen continued to experience painful cramps, nausea, and bloody diarrhea. She has yet to fully recover from her illness.

“Lettuce from Aunt Mid’s Produce has been positively identified as the source of this outbreak,” said Ms. Steffen’s attorney William Marler. “Despite calls to reveal the source of the tainted lettuce—a pivotal step toward ensuring that there is no additional tainted product in the supply chain—Aunt Mid’s has refused to do so. Food distributors are responsible only to their direct consumers but also to the food supply system as a whole. By withholding information about a contamination event, Aunt Mid’s Produce is not doing their part to keep food safe for everyone.”

Although E. coli outbreaks are often associated with meat, produce-borne outbreaks have become more frequent in recent years. The Center for Science in the Public Interest noted that fully 25 percent of E. coli outbreaks from 1990-1998 were traced to produce. Data from the Centers for Disease Control show that over the last 12 years, twenty-two E. coli outbreaks have been traced specifically to leafy greens, including the spinach outbreak in 2006, which made more than 200 ill and caused four deaths.

E. coli Victim Sues Lettuce Supplier

MSU student sues Detroit produce supplier following E. coli illness

Lettuce that Sickened 37 in Michigan Linked to California

Student Sues for E. coli Damages

 

As the Boulder County Health Department continuec as the week ended  to count the ill linked to Jimmy Johns, more recalls of E. coli-tainted meat where announced overnight.  Possible Links?

Colorado Firm Recalls Frozen Beef Products Due To Possible E. coli

Colorado Foods Products, a Greenwood Village, Co., establishment, is recalling approximately 2,340 pounds of frozen beef trim that may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service. 60-pound bulk boxes of “BM-95 BONELESS BEEF.” Each shipping container bears the establishment number “Nicaragua 4” inside the Nicaraguan mark of inspection. The shipping label bears the item number “00003,” and pack date of “8-19-08.” The frozen beef trim products were produced on Aug. 19, 2008, and were exported to the United States and then sent to distributors and establishments in California. These products were sent to establishments for further processing and will likely not bear the establishment number “Nicaragua 4” on products available for direct consumer purchase.

Florida Firm Recalls Frozen Beef Products Due To Possible E. coli

A.C.S. Meyners Ltda., a Ponte Verde, Fl., establishment, is recalling approximately 20,460 pounds of frozen beef trim that may be contaminated with E. coli O157:H7, the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service announced today.  60-pound bulk boxes of “BM-95 BONELESS BEEF.” Each shipping container bears the establishment number “Nicaragua 4” inside the Nicaraguan mark of inspection. The shipping label bears the item number “00003,” and pack date of “8-19-08.”  The frozen beef trim products were produced on Aug. 19, 2008, and were exported to the United States and then sent to distributors and establishments in New York and Pennsylvania. These products were sent to establishments for further processing and will likely not bear the establishment number “Nicaragua 4” on products available for direct consumer purchase.

E. coli Possible in Recalled Meat in Wisconsin

Astro Meats & Seafood Inc., is recalling about 4,200 pounds of frozen beef trim shipped to distributors and establishments in Indiana and Wisconsin that may be contaminated with E. coli. The recall announced Wednesday by the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service includes 60-pound bulk boxes of "BM-95 BONELESS BEEF." The shipping label has the item number "00003" and pack date of "8-19-08."

E. coli Linked to Boulder Jimmy John’s

Spate of E. coli infections linked to Boulder eatery

Jimmy John’s Closed for E. coli Investigation

Jimmy John’s Reopens After E. coli Outbreak

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